Francesca Mazzotta
3 minutes

Child-archaeologists at the discovery of the popular Testaccio neighbourhood

Thanks to a collaboration between the Special Superintendency for the Colosseum & the Central Archaeological Area of ​​Rome and Explora, the new Children’s Museum of Rome is born inside the New Market of Testaccio, on the remains of an ancient horreum (a Roman warehouse). A real multi-sensory journey to discover the history of Rome. It is an innovative, stimulating and technologically advanced site, based on the combination of archaeological research and a learning-by-doing teaching methodology.

Upside down! wants to tell a different story of the ancient city, changing perspective on the famous tales and reconstructing the daily life of the Roman working-class, far from the places of power and from the great imperial dwellings. A cultural panorama will unfold before the eyes of the little visitors, ranging from nutrition, agronomy, and marine engineering, to society, customs, construction and geography. Through history and archeology, children, accompanied by an operator, will also undertake a journey of territorial knowledge.

In ancient times the Testaccio neighbourhood was a large port and commercial district of Rome, populated by markets. Artefacts and buildings dating back to the Roman period between the 1st and the 3rd century AD were found below the area of ​​the New Market of Testaccio, represented by a large warehouse –horreum– and by an area below intended for the deposit and recycling of amphora fragments. Aside from the didactic experience, there is also the possibility to visit the fascinating archaeological area with your children: a journey through time to discover, after having played with archaeologists “above”, what the archaeologists discovered “under” your very feet!

Sunday, March 17th, 2019 from 3.30 pm to 5.00 pm, you will be able to take part in “Da grande faro’ archeologo // When I grow up I want to be an archeologist”. Showing his inseparable working tools, the simplest recovery techniques and a sampling of materials, an attentive archaeologist will reveal every curiosity about the world of archeology to the children, creating an incredible experience, which will allow them to immerse themselves in history by living the emotion of discovery. The children will be involved in an exciting “archaeological treasure hunt”. A careful and conclusive examination of the material found will lead them to confront each other, as a true “team” of scientists, to define the type of object and to reconstruct together its long history.

At the end of the workshop, you can visit the archaeological area below. For information, prices and reservations, refer to the Sottosopra Facebook page.

PLUS: Also on Sunday, March 17th from 10.30 to 11.30, Sottosopra! also organizes a trip to the River Port of Testaccio. This is where goods would arrive from all over the Mediterranean which, having landed in the ports of Ostia and Porto, were ready to be distributed in the horrea of the whole city. An opportunity for the whole family to discover this popular but fascinating district of the capital.

 

Francesca Mazzotta

Con una Laurea in Scienze Politiche, un Master in Business Administration e una carriera in ambito Finance e Insurance, Francesca Mazzotta ha una doppia vita. Fanatica di giochi da tavolo (il marito è autore di boardgame e cardgame, che testano assieme ai molti amici gamer), giochi di ruolo, videogiochi, libri per bambini, fumetti, film e cartoni animati, serie TV e più in generale tutto quello che riguarda la cosiddetta cultura POP, dopo il lavoro e le due figlie, le notti sono dedicate ai suoi mondi fantastici, persa in avventure terribili e meravigliose in luoghi lontani nel tempo e nello spazio. Dopo aver gestito per anni l'organizzazione della ludoteca GiocaRoma, ha scritto per Videogame.it e Outcast.it. E’ fermamente convinta che il segreto di una vita felice stia nella capacità di conciliare il proprio percorso di crescita personale con la cura e la costante attenzione all'ascolto del proprio bambino interiore.

 

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